A social practice platform for artists, designers, writers & assorted projects
in the developing world.

Tumblr
Facebook
Twitter

officeocd@gmail.com

START HERE.

An initiative for smart humanitarian aid.

START HERE... is an international network of events that aim to raise funds, foment dialogue and build awareness for the long-term problematics of the triple disaster in the Philippines.

Supertyphoon Haiyan (Yolanda)
12 million people affected, especially in the areas of Northern Cebu, Samar and Leyte islands in the Visayas.

Bohol Island Earthquake
1.3 million people affected in the Visayas.

Zamboanga City Siege
100,000 people affected in Mindanao.

START HERE... is a think-and-do tank that collaborates to create long-term aid programs focused on shelter and livelihood for the over 13.4 million people affected by all 3 disasters.

A list sent by health workers on Bantayan Island. They needed to restock basic items at the local pharmacy of Madridejos. This list has since been covered by private donations.

http://www.officeocd.com/files/gimgs/th-12_PHARMACY.png
 

PLATFORM ISSUES

1) LONG-TERM AID PROGRAMS (SHELTER AND LIVELIHOOD FOCUS)

In the aftermath of a natural or human disaster, the international community (via NGOs and the like) generally rushes in to administer "first aid." Aligning their efforts with a long-term rehabilitation view proves difficult when their mandate is to act immediately. What may result is a large financial investment in programs that are temporary bandages instead of a self-sustaining cure.

START HERE... comes from the idea that the humanitarian model and all related fields of activity need to focus even more on long term programs addressing issues such as shelter & livelihood or climate change & food security. So that the affected communities may stand on their own two feet, independent of the aid crutch, and so that replicable response systems in are set in place when the next crisis hits.

A list sent by Tacloban radio journalists whose community radio station was wiped out by Typhoon Haiyan. The journalists are affiliated to PECOJON, an international organization that helps journalists affected by disaster. This list is still open to donors. Contact us at office[at]officeocd[dot]com to send cash or gear directly to these journalists.

http://www.officeocd.com/files/gimgs/th-12_PECOJON 1.jpg
 

2) EMPOWERING LOCAL LEADERSHIP
(TWO-WAY, EAST-WEST COLLABORATION)

There is a chain of well-known frustrations in the disaster response community: "first" aid pours in, western systems or pet technologies are set in place, local leaders feel slighted, uninvolved or unappreciated, uphill battles ensue, international aid pulls out after 12 months, the systems set in place fail to take root. What may result is a growing communication barrier between east and west, with each side carrying unresolved grievances into the next disaster situation.

START HERE... believes that Eastern knowledge is as valuable as Western, moreso because it comes from an innate understanding of complex local situations: from environmental to social to logistical. If international aid is to succeed in empowering communities in crisis, it must partner with locally-grown initiatives, businesses and leaders by giving them an equal place at the work table. So that tailor-made solutions, and not one-sided impositions, can be implemented with lasting effects.

Another list by Tacloban journalists who wish to resume their professional activities. Contact us at office[at]officeocd[dot]com to send cash or gear directly to these journalists.

http://www.officeocd.com/files/gimgs/th-12_PECOJON 2.jpg
 

3) BEST PRACTICES IN THE POLITICS OF GIVING
(SMART GIVING VS. BINGE GIVING)

Giving without knowing exactly what a disaster-affected community needs, the social or lifestyle nuances that donations must fit within, or the impact that aid will have on local economic or political structures is not the best approach. Everyone giving immediately, instead of scaling donations over time to ensure distribution over the mid and long term, can be wasteful. (For example, surplus aid can negatively affect local economies in ways similar to illegal price-dumping of goods, as explained by Walden Bello in his book The Food Wars.) Giving without understanding why we are giving, or to whom we are giving, breeds misunderstanding. What may result in donors is a culture of binge-giving prone to narcissism or fed by misinformation. What may result in recipients is a culture of an aid-dependence rooted in opportunism or steeped in servitude.

START HERE... understands that goodwill and generosity can backfire if not accompanied by due diligence research into the local situation. START HERE knows that would-be donors want to be informed—as much as field workers and survivors want to share information—but that it is not easy to find information sources that are comprehensive and easy for non-humanitarian workers to understand. This is why START HERE has chosen to compile information that puts forth a straight-forward local approach to disaster response in the Philippines. So that "smart" giving and "seamless" reception cycles may take stronger root.

http://www.officeocd.com/files/gimgs/th-12_KIDS.png
 

4) S.T.E.A.M SOLUTIONS
(HARNESSING POWER OF CREATIVE COMMUNITY)

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, ARTS & MATHS is an initiative pioneered by Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) that advocated a shift from STEM to STEAM knowledge. The movement champions an integral role for artists and designers within the sciences to drive innovation. The solutions that may result from lateral thinking skills applied to research and development in the humanitarian arena are advances we would like to test on the Filipino post-crisis field, as soon as possible.

START HERE...
wants to harness the power of the creative fields within a realistic and practical framework of projects. So that solutions for superweather-ready shelter and post-disaster livelihood may be found in time for the next crisis.

Lists sent by members of OCD's School of the Presidents project. Bantayan Island, where they live, was only 15km away from the eye of the typhoon. Their houses were completely wiped out. This basic list has been filled, but do contact us at office[at]officeocd[dot]com if you wish to help in other ways.

http://www.officeocd.com/files/gimgs/th-12_tumblr_mwywfmW5UQ1qiy1fuo2_1280.jpg
 

CLICK ON TEXT BELOW AND SHARE FULL INSTRUCTIONS WITH PEOPLE WHO MIGHT NEED THESE INVENTIONS

SKETCH 1: Windmill device made out of a ceiling fan and a bamboo pole. Bantayan Islanders were making these after the storm to charge their mobile phones.

SKETCH 2: Instructions for how to turn a motorcycle into a charging station. Seen in Tubigon after the earthquake hit. Power had not yet been restored to the town, so a local resident of the Pandan neighborhood turned his bike into an income-generating charging station for residents to charge their phones, laptops, tablets and flashlights.

http://www.officeocd.com/files/gimgs/th-12_tumblr_mwyyguz1aJ1qiy1fuo4_1280.jpg
 

START ANYWHERE.

Lists. Make one. It's the best way to start solving a huge problem. The power of the pen is something we strongly believe in.

More lists that have been filled. Town hall repairs for a small barangay and home repairs for 24 loom-weaver and 5 fishing families, all earthquake survivors from Bohol.

Many more families are still in need. Contact us at office[at]officeocd[dot]com if you are a human being that wants to make a personal and direct contribution to families from Tubigon, Bohol. We are just the middle men. All private donations go directly and in full to those affected.

http://www.officeocd.com/files/gimgs/th-12_20140106_131637.jpg
 
http://www.officeocd.com/files/gimgs/th-12_20131202_101357_resized_1.jpg
 
http://www.officeocd.com/files/gimgs/th-12_20140106_134419_resized.jpg